Grimm Tales – Philip Pullman

I mentioned that it was the 200th anniversary of the Brothers Grimm last week and one book which seems to have made the most of this timing is Philip Pullman’s ‘Grimm Tales’. This is a book that I have to admit I didn’t hear about until it was out, I would have expected more fanfare to be honest, and as soon as I heard about it I simply had to get my hands on it. It also seemed the perfect time of year, just before Christmas and just after the anniversary, to talk about it when there is that little sense of nostalgia and magic in the air and these tales are just the sort of thing to turn to either between the festive franticness or indeed if you need to escape from your family at any point. Oh… none of you feel the need to do the latter, how awkward.

Penguin Classics, hardback, 2012, fiction, 406 pages, from my personal TBR

I thought, before embarking upon reading them, that ‘Grimm Tales – For Young and Old’ would be Philip Pullman completely retelling the tales of the Brothers Grimm. In a way it is, though Pullman admits himself that he has only lightly retold them, yet in a way it sort of isn’t. That’s a helpful explanation from me isn’t it?

What Pullman really does is tell the stories as they were originally, basically before they were Disney-fied or Ladybird-ily made brighter and more chipper, putting back in all the darker details and the twists and turns that have strangely been forgotten, or maybe airbrushed is a better expression. He also gives the language a little tweak here and there and modernises it for the new younger reader too. In modernising them it seems Pullman is making them more relevant for the youth of today, he also adds referential relevance for adult readers in the part of the book that I almost enjoyed as the tales themselves. How does he do this? Each story finds itself with end notes which tell you the ‘type’ of story it is, where the Brothers Grimm heard it, where else worldwide it’s been told, how the Brothers changed it and how he has changed it, modernised it or made it work better (in his opinion) too.

Notes on Cinderella

Notes on Cinderella

In doing this, and in fact with the wonderful introduction to the true history of the tales which of course I left to read till last, we are almost given double the delight of the fifty (the Brothers Grimm actually recorded over 200 tales) as not only do we have the joy of reading them, with their full uncut endings, we also have the joy of discovering more about them. I really loved this aspect of the book and found on occasion I preferred the stories behind the stories to some of the stories themselves – not all the time, only once or twice.

As to the collection of tales themselves, well with favourites like ‘Snow White’, ‘Cinderella’, ‘Rumplestiltskin’, ‘Hansel and Gretel’, etc I was always going to be pleased. I was more so by the inclusion of lots and lots of tales that I hadn’t heard of before. New favourites such as ‘Little Brother and Little Sister’, which has the most boring title but is a tale of wicked stepmothers, witches, murder and even ghosts, are going to become favourites to re-read. Even if I wasn’t bowled over by a couple of them I enjoyed reading them for the fact they were new to me.

As for my old favourites, well of course I was thrilled to read them. I was delighted when I read Perrault’s original tales a few years ago by the darkness and the endings that my Ladybird classics certainly didn’t have, and this happened again with Pullman’s ‘Grimm Tales’. You will probably know that my very favourite as a child was ‘Rapunzel’ (so much so that is what I named my pet duck, no really) and I was quite horrified and thrilled when I discovered – spoiler alert – the twist was that Rapunzel not only got her haircut off, sent away and the prince blinded, but that she was actually pregnant (before marriage!!!!!) and became a homeless mother of twins before being reunited with her prince. Well I never!  They didn’t put that twist in ‘Tangled’ did they?

“The witch was lying in wait. She had tied Rapunzel’s hair to the window hook, and when she heard him call, she threw it down as the girl had done. The prince climbed up, but instead of his beloved Rapunzel, at the window he found an ugly old woman, demented with anger, whose eyes flashed with fury as she railed at him:
  ‘You’re her fancy-boy, are you? You worm your way into the tower, you worm your way into her affections, you worm your way into her bed, you rogue, you leech, you lounge-lizard, you high-born mongrel! Well, the bird’s not in her nest anymore! The cat got her. What d’you think of that, eh? And the cat’ll scratch your pretty eyes out too before she’s finished. Rapunzel’s gone, you understand? You’ll never see her again!’”

Overall I really enjoyed Pullman’s ‘Grimm Tales’, occasionally there was the odd dud and the language sometimes felt too current, which I don’t think fairy or folk tales should ever do really, but I loved the favourites and the wealth of information that you learn about the Brothers Grimm’s and the tales themselves. I have heard some people miser about the fact Pullman hasn’t really done anything original with this collection just retold the tales, but 200 years ago that is exactly what the Brothers Grimm were doing wasn’t it?

Has anyone else given this collection a whirl? Which other collections of folk and fairy tales would you recommend? I have to admit I am quite keen to try Italo Calvino’s ‘Italian Folktales’, which is mentioned a lot by Pullman in this book. Finally, what is your very favourite fairy tale and why?

11 Comments

Filed under Penguin Books, Penguin Classics, Philip Pullman, Review

11 responses to “Grimm Tales – Philip Pullman

  1. I have this on my shelf, but (inevitably I’m afraid) haven’t got around to starting it yet. My favourite fairy tales are all HC Andersen ones – The little match girl, and the Little Mermaid, the first for its sadness, the second for making clear the price of magic.

    Have a magical Christmas Simon. Cheers!

    • I have lots of books that are in the same position Annabel so I honestly wouldn’t worry. I think that is just a book lovers life isn’t it?

      The Little Mermaid is so, so, so sad.

      I had a lovely Christmas, well two technically, hope you did too.

  2. Col

    Not a fairy tale re-working but I liked Simon Armitages recent re-write of the Morte D’Arthur – I’ve loved the Arthur legends since I was a kid!
    Not got round to reading Grimm Tales yet – but it sounds good so I will promote it higher up the list on my TBR pile in the New Year!
    My favourite fairy tale is The Frog Prince.

    • I used to love those as a kid too, I even when to Tintagel (probably spelt wrong) when I was younger. I have never thought to re-read them as an adult, I wonder if I would still like them?

  3. novelinsights

    Sounds really interesting. My favourite fairy stories are from Terry Jones’s original collection Fairy Tales. Top ones were ‘The Beast With a Thousand Teeth’, ‘The Rainbow Cat’ and The Three Raindrops’ which all manage to be new but feel old-world.

  4. I was just given this to me for Christmas by a dear friend. I can’t wait to start reading it!

  5. Michelle

    Oh my god that looks beautiful!

    I just got myself the Vintage edition of “The Brothers Grimm’s Tales”, completely unaware of the existence of this book.

    Just imagining a combination of Philip Pullman and the Brothers Grimm is enough to make me lust after this!

    Here’s wishing you a great Christmas!

    • I have that edition of The Brothers Grimm’s Tales too and was planning on reading that but might save that for next Christmas actually. I hope you manage to get a copy of this and that you too had a lovely Christmas.

  6. Pingback: Why I Still Turn to Fairytales… | Savidge Reads

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