Tag Archives: Clare Clark

Vicariously Through The Victorians…

As I mentioned a few weeks ago I really do love the autumn, especially for reading. I have been going through my TBR pile on and off over the last week and with certain worrying matters going on off the blog I have been looking for thrilling yet comforting books which will keep me reading. I tend to get readers block when lots of things are going on, I am sure this happens to all of us, and so these reads should combat this. However my version of thrilling yet comforting might not be the same as yours, as mine tend to involve the foggy, mysterious and dark streets of Victorian London, as the hoard I pulled down shows.

Now because I was being all arty-farty by having them on my ever-so suitable Victorian reading chair in the lounge you might not be able to make them all out. Well, it is quite a mixture. First up we have the fiction from the time in the form of ‘The Memoirs of Sherlock Holmes’ by Sir Arthur Conan Doyle, which I think sums up Victorian London at that time wonderfully, along with ‘The Odd Women’ by George Gissing which I have to admit I really bought (ages ago) because of the title, it just sounds quite me. I am also planning, through my new venture ‘Classically Challenged’, on finally reading two of the authors that many say are the literary greats, Anthony Trollope and the Charles Dickens.

I have thrown in some non-fiction into the mix too. I really struggle with non-fiction, it has to have a narrative and drive or I just get bored. In the case of ‘Beautiful Forever’ by Helen Rappaport (which I think my mother bought me two maybe three Christmas’ ago, oops) there should be no worry at all as it is the tale of Madame Rachel of Bond Street who ‘peddled products which claimed almost magical powers’ ripped people off and blackmailed them. I cannot wait for this, why have I left it so long. The same goes for Mary S. Hartman’s ‘Victorian Murderesses’ which I found in a book swap cafe last year. I don’t tend to mention that I like true crime writing, well I do, and this one looks great. Finally, non-fiction wise, I have ‘Wilkie Collins’ by Peter Ackroyd (I should have read this in the spring) which I am hoping if isn’t a narrative based non-fiction book will hook me in because I am such a big fan of Wilkie, full stop.

Finally I have thrown in three neo-Victorian novels, interestingly all by female authors about fictional women who stood up to Victorian ethics by all accounts, ‘The Journal of Dora Damage’ by Belinda Starling, ‘Little Bones’ by Janette Jenkins and ‘Beautiful Lies’ by Clare Clark. So there is some really exciting reading to look forward to. Yet before I start all these I am going to be meeting some very special ladies who I will be asking for more recommendations from as I will be discussing Victorian books, why they are so tempting to read and to write with them on Tuesday at Manchester Literature Festival

 

Yes, Jane Harris of one-of-my-all-time-favourite-ever-novels ‘Gillespie and I’ fame, who has also rather luckily become a lovely friend and the lovely Essie Fox, who did a special Victorian episode of The Readers and has written ‘The Somnambulist’ and has ‘Elijah’s Mermaid’ coming out soon (which I have read in advance and cannot wait to tell you all about at the start of November. I will be asking them for recommendations from the period, about the period and set in the period – and reporting back of course.

Now… do you have any recommendations of books about/set in the times of/written by Victorians and if so what? Oh and if you have any questions for Jane and Essie let me know and I will ask them especially.

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Updates & Big Thank You’s

I have been meaning to say a big thanks for everyone who has popped by and wished me well over the last week or so since my hospital visit. An update on that is that I had another procedure last week and have another one coming next week after which, fingers crossed, we should know what the heck we are dealing with as everything seems a bit cloak and dagger at the minute. I am once again up at Mum’s for some recuperation and it also happens to be her birthday TODAY! Gran is here too and there have already been quite a few discussions about books… my poor step-dad and brother!

Anyway one of the things that I wanted to say a big thanks for was your recommendations for books to read whilst resting (am having a bit of a rubbish reading time at the mo) but also to those of you who have sent me some reading material especially, some of you want to remain nameless but regardless I want to share some of the lovely loot, which I photographed last week on my window seat.

The Woman’s Room by Marilyn French – really excited about this as heard its superb, hope that it lives up to the hype.

Reality and Dreams by Muriel Spark – you all know how I am quite into my Spark and this sounds like it could be a corker.

Suite Francaise
by Irene Nemirovsky – I tried this for a book group a few years ago and really didn’t love it but since reading ‘Jezebel’ I have been of a mind to give this one another try.

The Extraordinary and Unusual Adventures of Horatio Lyle
by Catherine Webb – I had never heard of this until an email asking me for my address to receive a ‘Victorian treat’ arrived and it does indeed like this will be a wonderful escapist Victorian romp.

The Silence of the Rain
by Luiz Alfredo Garcia-Roza – The lovely Marcia of Lizzy’s Literary Life sent me this one for my Reading for Brazil challenge which I have been a little lax on, however with my health it looks like I might not be going so I shall have to read about it instead 😦

The Great Stink by Clare Clark – another Savidge Reader thought this book and its Victorian routes might be just the thing for me, am rather excited about this one instantly.

Wait For Me!
by Deborah Devonshire – sent by the lovely Simon T of Stuck-in-a-Book as a thank you for staying at mine a while back, this is one I am desperate to read… and so am naturally holding back from reading, why do we do this to ourselves? I actually had two of these but have given the second to Gran, in fact Mum and Gran have recieved two large piles of my cast off books which they have been thrilled with!

So a HUGE thanks for all of these as they are most appreciated and will be read at some point. I do love it when surprise parcels pop through the letter box it’s been an added boost to all your kind comments and emails. So seriously thank you very much.

I should also thank the publishers as a few newly released books have appeared of late in the house which I am also looking forward to.

Book of Clouds by Chloe Aridjis – not sure where… but have heard this is brilliant.

The Piano Teacher by Elfriede Jelinek – I have never heard of this or the other ‘Serpents Tail Classic’ I was sent (see below) but this does really appeal.

They Shoot Horses Don’t They
by Horace McCoy – Another classic as mentioned above that I hadn’t heard of but sounds like it might be an interesting read. I do worry sometimes that I have such a limited knowledge of certain classics.

The Unit
by Ninni Holmqvist – Sounds a bit sci-fi and I am having some cravings for science fiction which is most unlike me, so if you have any suggestions let me know.

Packing For Mars
by Mary Roach – ridiculously excited that this has arrived as I loved ‘Stiff’ so much and think that having gotten on so well with her when she talked me through cadavers she might be just the person to get my head around the science of space, especially as she asks all the questions I would want to such as ‘what happens if you need the toilet or throw up in a spacesuit?’

The Bride Time Forgot
by Paul Magrs – I was thrilled to see this arrive as I love the ‘Brenda & Effie’ series, I then realised I still haven’t read the fourth in the series ‘Hell’s Belles’ oops.

The Distant Hours
by Kate Morton – I am not sure how I feel about this book. You see I read her first book and thought it was ok but nowt special, and this looks a monster… and yet there is something about the cover that makes me think I do want to read it! Eek!

So what have you had arrive or been out and bought of late? What have you read that’s blinking brilliant that everyone should know about? Right I best get back to Mum’s birthday celebrations, we are all shortly off to see ‘RED’ at the cinema, Mums choice (!!!) and then off to a Charity Hog Roast, Bonfire Party and Firework Display later on. Hope you’ve got good weekends lined up?

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The Actual Orange Prize Longlist 2010

So here it is the actual Orange Prize List and ok so it doesn’t really resemble my list from yesterday (and before anyone asks I have no idea whats going on with images on the site today – apols) in anyway shape or form but I did actually guess 6 and mentioned ‘The Little Stranger’ and am indeed kicking myself as I thought that ‘Black Mamba Boy’ might get in there and didn’t pop it in my final 20. I would have guessed 8 then… though that still isn’t half the list, ha!

Anyway in the name of fun I have popped the ones I actually guessed in italics and the ones that I have actually read, all two and a half of them, in bold and then the ones I own (though I think a couple of these I don’t are on the way to Savidge Towers) and might read, no pressure if I don’t, before the winner is announced have stars next to them.

Rosie Alison – The Very Thought of You (Alma Books)
Eleanor Catton – The Rehearsal (Granta)
Clare Clark – Savage Lands (Harvill Secker)*
Amanda Craig – Hearts and Minds (Little, Brown)
Roopa Farooki – The Way Things Look to Me (Pan Books)
Rebecca Gowers – The Twisted Heart (Canongate)
M.J. Hyland – This is How (Canongate)
Sadie Jones – Small Wars (Chatto & Windus)*
Barbara Kingsolver – The Lacuna (Faber and Faber)
Laila Lalami – Secret Son (Viking)
Andrea Levy – The Long Song (Headline Review)*
Attica Locke – Black Water Rising (Serpent’s Tail)
Maria McCann – The Wilding (Faber and Faber)
Hilary Mantel – Wolf Hall (Fourth Estate)*
Nadifa Mohamed – Black Mamba Boy (HarperCollins)*
Lorrie Moore – A Gate at the Stairs (Faber and Faber)
Monique Roffey – The White Woman on the Green Bicycle (Simon and Schuster)
Amy Sackville – The Still Point (Portobello Books)
Kathryn Stockett – The Help (Fig Tree)*
Sarah Waters – The Little Stranger (Virago)*

What do you think of the list? It’s given me food for thought.

Do you think Wolf Hall will just clear up again? Could Lorrie Moore’s first full novel win? Is this Sarah Waters year? And what about those left off? I am gutted not to see Evie Wyld on the list and could actually have a small wobbly about it, but I shan’t – its not dignified. What about Margaret Atwood’s lacking presence? Which other books would you have loved to see on there but haven’t?

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