Tag Archives: Ruth Padel

February’s Incomings…

I do love those lists that some bloggers have down the side of their blogs where  the jacket covers of all the incomings that they have received or are receiving as the weeks go on can be seen. Sadly, though I am sure that there is one on wordpress, I have no idea how to do such a thing and as I started one last month I thought I would do another end of month post (which might become a monthly feature) of the books that have arrived this month. Now if you don’t like these sort of posts fear not as you can discuss the pro’s and con’s of big books with me today on this post here instead. However if you love these posts, as I do on other blogs, then lets take a gander at what has been quite a crop of books.

First up it’s the hardbacks and as you will see while a lot of books do come from publishers some are treats from other lovely people, or simply treats from me.

  • Snowdrops by A.D. Miller – This is a book I had been told was winging its way to me and I got very excited about and then the mail man mislaid it. Now it’s here and over the next week or so I am going to be throwing myself into Russia which is a country that fascinates me and yet I know very, very little about. I am wondering if the atmosphere, which is meant to be incredible in this novel, will send me off to read some of the Russian greats.
  • Beautiful Forever by Helen Rappaport – This came out last year and is non-fiction about “Madame Rachel of Bond Street – cosmetician, con-artist and blackmailer” true life Victorian dastardly goings on, what could be more me. This was a belated Xmas pressie from my mother which she brought down last week.
  • One of Our Tuesdays is Missing by Jasper Fforde – The latest Thursday Next novel and a timely reminder I need to start at the beginning (I wanted to see him at Waterstones tomorrow but I will be in hospital, grrr).
  • The Tenderloin by John Butler – a Green Carnation Prize submission from Picador.
  • The Path of Minor Planets by Andrew Sean Greer – One of Faber and Faber’s entries for the Green Carnation Prize. (Publishers are really onto it early this year – hoorah!)
  • Mrs Fry’s Diary by Mrs Stephen Fry – I bought this at Sainsbury’s for £3 on a whim as thought might make me laugh at hospital.
  • Sleeping With Mozart by Anthea Church – I was thrilled when Virago got in touch and asked me to read this but sadly I didn’t care for it much and as I don’t like doing negative reviews it’s leaving me in a real quandary, to write about or not to write about? Hmmm!
  • Darkside by Belinda Bauer – I loved Belinda’s debut ‘Blacklands’ and having been in a crime mood this was ideal. Thoughts will be up tomorrow (if everything works right) on this murder mystery.
  • Ape House by Sara Gruen – After reading ‘Water for Elephants’ for book group and loving it, I am thrilled that Sarah’s publishers Two Roads wanted me to give her latest a whirl.
  • Cedilla by Adam Mars-Jones – This is the second Faber entry for the Green Carnation so far and its HUGE (I am talking big books later) and one I am looking forward to as it’s the sequel to the rather marvellous ‘Pilcrow’ though I will be judging it as a stand alone book of course.

Phew that’s quite a few. Onto paperbacks which have been arriving thick and fast. I haven’t included the Jo Nesbo parcel which arrived and I mentioned before, nor have I included the two rather large shopping spree’s which I undertook in February both on a visit to Granny Savidge in Matlock and on a day out in Yorkshire earlier this month. Shame on me, still somehow I managed to buy a few in this lot too.

  • Through The Wall by Ludmilla Petrushevskaya – The lovely Novel Insights brought me this Penguin Mini Classic last week on a visit as she thought it would be right up my street. I have a feeling she will be spot on.
  • Heat & Dust by Ruth Prawer Jhabvala – A booker prize charity shop find for 50p. I have said I do intend to read all the winners at some point and have devoured this one so expect thoughts soon.
  • The Novel in the Viola by Natasha Solomons – I really enjoyed ‘Mr Rosenblum’s List’ when I read it last year and actually chattered and nattered to Natasha when she was working on this one so I know a bit about the plot and it sounded fascinating so I have everything crossed this will be a corker.
  • The Bride That Time Forgot by Paul Magrs – The latest Brenda and Effie adventure in paperback, again reminding me I am slightly behind with this series. I also have a spare so expect a give away at some point.
  • Where The Serpent Lives by Ruth Padel – I know nothing of this book but isn’t she the lady that caused a lot of controversy over something and nothing?
  • South Riding by Winifred Holtby – I have devoured this one and my thoughts on it are here.
  • The Surrendered by Chang-Rae Lee – Another book I know nothing about but having read the quotes and page 29 (all the blurb says is ‘read page 29’) this looks like it could be an astounding book.
  • Slammerkin by Emma Donoghue – As you will all know I loved ‘Room’ and this is a reissued copy of her earlier historical novel (I am hoping it’s a Victorian romp) which I am excited about. I have already got an American edition of this which I am now handing over to Granny Savidge Reads who, after reading ‘Room’, is a Donoghue fan too.
  • The Hare with Amber Eyes by Edmund De Waal – I so wasn’t bothered about this when it came out but since winning the Costa Prize and having heard about it all over the place when it arrived I was super chuffed and have started dipping into it already.
  • The Magnificent Spilsbury and the Case of the Brides in the Bath by Jane Robins – I do like true historical crime, modern stuff makes me feel uncomfortable in general – too close to home maybe, but this sounds like its right up my street. Maybe not one to read in the bath though?
  • 31 Bond Street by Ellen Horan – I bought this in Sainsbury’s, bad me, partly because the cover is so good and also thinking it was non-fiction from the blurb, wrong. I will give it a whirl though and see.
  • Half a Life by Darin Strauss – A memoir about accidental murder. I had to sign a confidence clause before I could get the proof for this and then forgot the date had been and gone so will schedule my thoughts to be shared soon.
  • The Long Song by Andrea Levy – I have already read this, however it’s a book group choice in the next few months and I’d had mine signed for my Gran so a new one has magically turned up. I am actually really looking forward to re-reading this one even so soon after I originally did.
  • Dog Binary by Alex MacDonald – I don’t know anything about this, it came with Half a Life.
  • Trick of the Dark by Val McDermid – I am hoping this is another entry for the Green Carnation Prize as we do want a mixture of genres, I don’t think the other judges have had this one though so I will have to check. I have heard McDermid is very good at murder so this should be good.

So lots of books to read while I am in waiting rooms, hospital wards and in bed when I get home over the next few weeks or so which is an utter delight. I wonder how much of a dent in them I will make. I also really need to have a fresh cull and clear out too. It never stops. Have you read any of these books and if so what did you think? Any you would like to see me give priority to if the whim takes me?

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Guessing The Orange Prize Longlist 2010

I do like a good guessing game, I can almost guarantee I will always be pretty much wrong but I still like to have a go anyway. The last bookish year saw me trying and failing (though I did better than the previous year) to guess the Man Booker Longlist (I did guess the winner though) and the winner of the Orange Longlist both of which I got wrong. It is my dream to one day be on a book prize panel of some sort and as it will never be the Orange I thought I would list you what I would put forward before the actual 20 are announced tomorrow. I haven’t read them all but really want to, all bar two I haven’t read are on my TBR.

It was quite hard choosing though as the books can’t be translated, have to have been published in the UK between the 1st April 2009 and 31st March 2010 (one book in my list is due out on both the 31st of March and 1st of April depending where you look so it may not make it, I went under the assumption that the 31st was correct) and all must be novels, no novellas. 

I have popped them all alphabetically in order of author surname so as you can’t guess my favourites…

   

Ms. Hempel Chronicles – Sarah Shun-lien Bynum
The Rehearsal – Eleanor Catton
War on the Margins – Libby Cone
Isa and May – Margaret Forster

   

How To Paint A Dead Man – Sarah Hall
Blueeyedboy – Joanne Harris
Dog Boy – Eva Hornung
Small Wars – Sadie Jones

   

The Long Song – Andrea Levy
Wolf Hall – Hilary Mantel
The Confessions of Edward Day – Valerie Martin
A Gate At The Stairs – Lorrie Moore

    

White is for Witching – Helen Oyeyemi
Where The Serpent Lives – Ruth Padel
The Boy Next Door – Irene Sabatini
Major Pettigrew’s Last Stand – Helen Simonson

   

The Help – Kathryn Stockett
Trespass – Rose Tremain
Dancing Backwards – Salley Vickers
After The Fire, A Still Small Voice – Evie Wyld

I will say another two titles were fighting for a place in the top twenty and they were ‘Black Mamba Boy’ by Nadifa Mohamed and ‘The Rapture’ by Liz Jensen so if the judges pick either of these then I will be kicking myself. I also originally had ‘A Beginners Guide To Acting English’ by Shappi Khorsandi not realising it was a memoir (have now seen the very tiny word on the back of the book, thank you Justine! You see it started off being quite tough and then I kept thinking of ‘just one more’ several times.

You might notice some big contenders of last year are missing from my list, titles such as Margaret Atwood’s The Year of the Flood’, Sarah Water’s ‘The Little Stranger’, Audrey Niffenegger’s ‘Her Fearful Symmetry’ and A. S. Byatt’s ‘The Children’s Book’ (though I don’t think she allows hers to be put forward) all four of which I read last year and thought were very good I just think they have had enough publicity already. You could say the same for Wolf Hall but I adored it more than very much liking it so it made my selection. It wouldn’t be a shock or a scandal to see any of those on the list though. 

So will I be anywhere near right? Quite unlikely, would be hilarious if I was though. What about all of you, what do you think might be seen on the Longlist this year? I am not planning on intentionally reading whatever the final twenty or even the short listed titles are, is anyone else?

Note: This was a post I scheduled the other week and I didn’t realise Jackie was doing one too which you can see over at Farmlanebooks if you havent already. Let me know if any more of you are doing this!

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These Could Cheer Anyone Up

A big thank you for all the lovely comments yesterday and all your thoughts, it was really lovely to know that you were all out there giving me your support and condolances. I won’t be replying individually as I don’t really want to dwell on it and so today I thought ‘what would be a joyful post after yesterday’ and so I thought I would share with you what has been arriving through the post box over the last few weeks from publishers at Savidge Reads HQ. Who out there can say they can’t be cheered up by lots of books arriving? Plus what could be more appropriate on World Book Day?

I have decided to arrange them in sizes, so let’s kick it all off with the paperbacks…

The Castle of Otranto – Horace Walpole
Someone at OUP obviously read my first post of my ‘do I want to read’ series as sure enough it arrived along with two more gothic friends you can see below.
The Silver Linings Playbook – Matthew Quick
Obviously this is one of the TV Book Group choices and I wouldn’t have heard of this without it am sure. I am looking forward to it just from the title alone. Might try and fit this in before it’s discussed on the telly.
I’m Not Scared – Niccolo Ammaniti
This looks like it could be a very me book as it centres on a ‘dilapidated farmhouse’ and dark discovery. I like the mystery of it and the covers quite dark and yet inviting.
The Italian – Ann Radcliffe
An author I have had on my radar for quite some time and not dared to try as Udolpho is so huge (see below) this looks much more manageable and just as gothic.
The Crossroads – Niccolo Ammaniti
Canongate must think me and Ammaniti are going to get on like a house on fire as they sent this with ‘I’m Not Scared’. Reading the blurb he sounds like an Italian Mankell would that be correct?
Alone in Berlin – Hans Fallada
I have seen the posters for this everywhere and so my Savidge Reads Radar has been beeping regularly alerting me that there could be a wonderful book out there I don’t own… which now I do, hoorah!
The Mysteries of Udolpho – Ann Radcliffe
Some say this is the greatest novel every written. I am hoping I have as much fun with this as I did with East Lynne the mother of all sensation novels, we will see.

Now to the, what do you call these size books? I call them the middle/in between sized ones but am sure that’s not the official term…

Oranges Are Not The Only Fruit – Jeanette Winterson
Winterson has been an author I have wanted to try for ages. I had this one already but the new 25th Anniversary edition is just gorgeous and so I will be delving into that very soon.
Once Again To Zelda – Marlene Wagman-Geller
A book I was alerted to thanks to the BBC’s Open Book. This is fifty stories behind fifty dedications in some of the world’s greatest books. With tales of why Jane Austen, Virginia Woolf, Agatha Christie, Oscar Wilde, Grace Metalious, J.K. Rowling and many more, dedicated  their books to the people they did.
Orphans of Eldorado – Milton Hatoum
The latest Canongate Myths book which is set in Brazil a country I want to read lots more about this year.
Where The Serpent Lives – Ruth Padel
Any book that has the settings of London, Devon and the jungles of India needs to be read frankly.
Bitter Leaf – Chioma Okereke
I have read some cracking African fiction in the last few months and want to read more so Virago must be psychic as this debut is ‘set in a world that is African but never geographically placed’ sounds intriguing. I have a hunch this might get an Orange mention… maybe.
Rupture – Simon Lelic
The blogosphere has been going crazy over this book of a teacher opening fire in a school assembly, in the last month or so. Will I be joining them in raving about it?

Finally the bigger books…

Homer & Langley – E.L. Doctorow
Another author I have always wanted to read and this book of two brothers who holed themselves up (like a male version of Grey Gardens in a way) from the world and lived alone in a dilapidated grand old building of New York. I have an inkling this will become a favourite of the year.
The Songwriter – Beatrice Colin
I utterly fell in love with Colin’s book ‘The Luminous Life of Lilly Aphrodite’ last year am hoping this book captures the same spell on me.
A Little Folly – Jude Morgan
Another author I loved last year as I read ‘The Taste of Sorrow’ and was mortified it wasn’t in the Man Booker Longlist as it was superb. Instead of the lives of the Bronte sisters or any other famous authors we are now treated to a scandalous tale of Regency London. I cannot wait!
The Pacific – Hugh Ambrose
A slightly leftfield rogue sending from Canongate. This has been made into a ten part series by Tom Hanks and Stephen Spielberg I gather. It looks a bit hard hitting as it’s about the real men involved in the war. I am intrigued but wary all at once.

So have you read any of those titles or anything else by any of the authors? Are any on your TBR or radar? What have you had arrive lately by post, by shopping or by library loaning?

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